Illegal markets harm people, democracies, the environment and hinder sustainable growth

20.01.2019

first issue of the Journal of Illicit Economies and Development (JIED), which deals with the interaction between illegal markets and development

In January 2019, the London School of Economics (LSE) and the Global Initiative Against Transnational Organized Crime published the first issue of the Journal of Illicit Economies and Development (JIED), which deals with the interaction between illegal markets and development. The opening issue reflects the presentations of the international colloquium "Addressing the Development Implications of Illicit Economies" from 19-20 April 2018. It was hosted by GPDPD on behalf of BMZ together with the University of Glasgow, Christian Aid and the Institute for Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) of the University of London. The authors discuss how the harmful effects of illegal economies, for example drug trafficking, on health, the environment, the stability of democratic institutions and public safety can be mitigated or avoided.

The LSE journal also focuses on the question of how the Agenda 2030 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) - such as poverty reduction, food security, the promotion of health, the protection of the environment and strong institutions - can be implemented in the presence of illegal economic structures. People live in conflict regions around the world marked by poverty and a lack of employment opportunities. They must constantly find new ways to secure their livelihoods. As legal sources of income are often scarce, illegal markets emerge, for example for drugs production and trafficking. Only by eliminating development deficits, the underlying root causes of illegal markets, communities can develop sustainably.

The approach of Alternative Development also pursues this goal. GPDPD contributed an article on its evolvement and relevance in international drug policy: „From Alternative Development to Sustainable Development: The Role of Development Within the Global Drug Control Regime“. Alternative Development aims at creating economic alternatives to the cultivation of illicit drug plants in order for small-scale farmers to secure their livelihoods in a sustainable way. This entails for example measures such as the improvement of the infrastructure in remote areas and the promotion of the market access for legal agricultural goods that are meant to improve the general conditions for rural development.

The first issue of the Journal of Illicit Economies and Development can be downloaded here. All information on further issues can be found on our Twitter channel.

 
 
1st edition JIED
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