Knowing What Works: Drug Policy Based on Science

Noticia

29.05.2019

Knowing What Works: Drug Policy Based on Science

Where political decisions are made, there are often complex and diverse problems that lack an obvious or simple solution. Science is trying to help with independent and evidence-based recommendations ¬¬– this also goes for drug policy. Particularly in the fight against the international drug problem, false information and resentment often dominate the political agenda. Science seeks to resist.

Where political decisions are made, there are often complex and diverse problems that lack an obvious or simple solution. Science is trying to help with independent and evidence-based recommendations ¬¬– this also goes for drug policy. Particularly in the fight against the international drug problem, false information and resentment often dominate the political agenda. Science seeks to resist.

The International Society for the Study of Drug Policy (ISSDP) is a community of researchers from all over the world. They explore manifold drug policy issues and strengthen scientific research in this field. How has drug consumption or cultivation changed after drug policy reforms? Which financing models for therapy programmes are effective? How can countries learn from each other in dealing with their drug problems? At the 13th ISSDP conference in Paris from 22 to 24 May 2019, around 260 participants from academia, civil society and politics exchanged views on these questions and many other topics related to drug policy. The aim is to improve the evidence base for drug policy decisions.

This year's topics included the opioid crisis in North America and the associated risks to public health, current developments in the regulation of medical and non-medical cannabis, and innovations in harm reduction, addiction care and therapy.

At the ISSDP conference, the GPDPD hosted a panel on current research on illicit drug economies in developing countries. The cultivation of drug crops takes place predominantly in countries of the Global South. Development deficits such as poverty, lack of infrastructure and health care, insecurity and a lack of state presence allow drug economies to flourish. At the same time, they are perpetuating these conditions and hindering the sustainable development of drug-growing regions.

It is important to look at the link between drug economies and development in order to assess the effectiveness of drug policy strategies. Nevertheless, there is a lack of research in this field. Even when asked about the number of smallholders illicitly cultivating drug crops such as opium poppy, cannabis or coca, there is currently no scientifically proven information available. The GPDPD aims to strengthen the position of development-oriented issues on the international drug policy research agenda.

Among other things, the panel discussed how science and practice can work better together in the areas of development, illegal drugs and fragility. Studies were presented on the number of households growing drug crops and the number of households involved in alternative development programmes. In addition, the example of coca cultivation in Colombia showed that it is usually not a lucrative source of income because small farmers live predominantly in poverty and structurally weak regions. The debate on the topics presented was lively and showed that the interface between drug policy and development deserves more attention – also in research.

Share.
 
Esta sitio está utilizando cookies. Al utilizar nuestra página web usted acepta el uso de cookies. Lea más sobre protección de datos. Close