GPDPD at the CND 2019: Human-centred drug policy

News

04.04.2019

GPDPD provided a strong impetus for a human-centred drug policy at this year's CND in Vienna, highlighting alternative development as an effective and established approach to global drug cultivation.

The Global Partnership on Drug Policies and Development (GPDPD) provided a strong impetus for a human-centred drug policy at this year's United Nations Commission on Narcotic Drugs (CND) meeting in Vienna (14-22 March 2019), highlighting alternative development as an effective and established approach to global drug cultivation.

During the two-day high-level ministerial segment of the CND, GPDPD presented the latest developments and current debates on the future of alternative development at a side event together with the governments of Thailand, Peru, Colombia and Austria as well as the European Union (EU), the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and the Thai Mae Fah Luang Foundation. More than 200 delegates attended the event, as well as the preceding reception of the German Federal Drug Commissioner Marlene Mortler.

Another great success was the launch of the International Guidelines on Human Rights and Drug Policy. The German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ) had provided substantial support for this guideline on human rights in drug policy, which was initiated by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the University of Essex. The guidelines have been presented for the first time in Vienna. They help governments to review their national drug control strategies with regard to the fulfilment of their human rights obligations.

As part of the German delegation, GPDPD also negotiated a resolution on behalf of the BMZ that placed alternative development as a development-centred strategy on the agenda of the international dialogue forum. After intensive negotiations, the resolution was already adopted on the second day of the regular programme. It summarises the results of a meeting of experts organised by Germany, Peru, Thailand and UNODC in 2018 and emphasises in particular the links between drug policy and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). In addition, it anchors gender and human rights approaches in the design of development projects in drug cultivation regions. As the resolution was being adopted, the EU and many other CND member states announced their political support through so-called co-sponsorship of the resolution.

During the regular CND week, two more side events co-organised by GPDPD took place: Under the heading "No Quality = No Market" the importance of involving the private sector in the implementation of alternative development was emphasized. In a further event, the new electronic and freely accessible Journal of Illicit Economies and Development was presented together with the London School of Economics. The journal addresses how illegal economies - especially the drug sector - inhibit human and social development and what development dynamics are associated with illegal markets.

Photo: Drogenbeauftragte/ @arnoldmike.com
Photo: Drogenbeauftragte/ @arnoldmike.com
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